Find Tests

Featured Tests

Dog Coat Color - Basic Panel (All breeds)

Group of multiple dogs of different breeds and coat colors

Promotional Pricing Now Available - $90 for this panel!

This basic dog coat color panel bundles together several genetic tests for coat color that are applicable to all breeds.

Cocoa

A brown coat color resulting in a slightly darker coat than the brown color caused by other variants. This color is seen in French Bulldogs and was previously referred to as “non-testable chocolate”.

Degenerative Myelopathy (DM)

Degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an inherited neurologic disorder of dogs characterized by gradual muscle wasting and loss of coordination typically beginning in the hind limbs.

Boxer Health Panel

Sitting Boxer dog

This panel bundles together several genetic tests relevant to Boxer health.

Dog Coat Color - Basic Panel (All breeds)

Group of multiple dogs of different breeds and coat colors

Promotional Pricing Now Available - $90 for this panel!

This basic dog coat color panel bundles together several genetic tests for coat color that are applicable to all breeds.

Dog Coat Color - Bulldog Panel

Basket full of Bulldog puppies

Promotional Pricing Now Available - $75 for this panel!

This panel of coat color tests is specifically tailored to the Bulldog breed.

Dog Coat Color - Great Dane Panel

Group of colorful Great Dane puppies

Promotional Pricing Now Available - $75 for this panel!

This panel of coat color tests is specifically tailored to the Great Dane breed.

Agouti (A Locus)

The Agouti Signaling Protein (ASIP) gene interacts with the MC1R gene to control red and black pigment switching in dogs, affecting amount, type, and distribution of the two pigments.

Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy (AHE)

Alaskan Husky encephalopathy is an inherited fatal neurological disorder characterized by seizures, trouble walking, a high stepping gait, trouble eating, and visual problems.

Alaskan Malamute Polyneuropathy (AMPN)

Alaskan Malamute polyneuropathy is an inherited neuromuscular defect of varying severity most often characterized by abnormal changes in the dog's gait and mobility.

Behavior Propensity in Belgian Malinois

Adverse owner-reported behaviors (such as seizure, “glazing over”, episodic biting, and general loss of clarity) in the Belgian Malinois have been associated with certain genetic polymorphisms in the dopamine transporter gene.

Canine Genetic Diversity

The Veterinary Genetics Laboratory (VGL), in collaboration with Dr. Niels C. Pedersen and staff, has developed a panel of short tandem repeat (STR) markers that will determine genetic diversity across the genome and in the Dog Leukocyte Antigen (DLA) class I and II regions. This test panel is useful to breeders who wish to track and increase genetic diversity of their breed as a long term goal. Please note, this test will not identify breed.

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy 1 (CMR1)

Canine multifocal retinopathy 1 is an inherited eye disease characterized by areas of retinal detachment. The disease does not typically lead to blindness or vision deficits.

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy 2 (CMR2)

Canine multifocal retinopathy 2 is an inherited eye disease characterized by areas of retinal detachment. The disease does not typically lead to blindness or vision deficits. The CMR2 mutation is associated with the Coton de Tulear breed.

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy 3 (CMR3)

Canine multifocal retinopathy 3 is an inherited eye disease characterized by areas of retinal detachment. The disease does not typically lead to blindness or vision deficits. The CMR3 mutation is associated with the Finnish Lapphund, Lapponian Herder, and Swedish Lapphund breeds.

Coat Length

Five recessive variants in the fibroblast growth factor-5 (FGF5) gene are associated with long hair phenotypes in dogs.

Cocoa

A brown coat color resulting in a slightly darker coat than the brown color caused by other variants. This color is seen in French Bulldogs and was previously referred to as “non-testable chocolate”.

Cone Degeneration

Loss of cone function due to cone degeneration results in day-blindness and decreased visual acuity. There are 2 known mutations of the CNGB3 gene that cause canine cone degeneration day-blindness in dogs.

Cone Rod Dystrophy 1 and 2

Cone Rod Dystrophy 1 and 2 cause early onset retinal degeneration leading to blindness in the American Staffordshire Terrier and American Pit Bull Terrier.

Congenital Ichthyosis in Golden Retrievers

Congenital ichthyosis is a skin condition in which the outer layer of the skin does not form properly and results in scaling. The condition often progresses to large patches of thickened, black, scaly skin.

Curl

A variant in the Keratin-71 gene is associated with curly hair in dogs. Dogs with the curl variant have curly coats or wavy coats depending on how many copies of the variant they possess.

Cystinuria Type I-A in Labrador Retrievers

Cystinuria type I-A is a kidney disorder in which the kidneys are unable to reabsorb cystine, leading to the formation of crystals in the urinary tract, which can cause urinary obstruction, difficulty in passing urine, and presence of blood in the urine.

Deafness with Vestibular Dysfunction (DVD), aka DINGS

In Doberman Pinschers, a neurological disorder causing deafness and balance/coordination issues, commonly referred to as DINGS, is associated with variants in two different genes. One appears to result in deafness in one ear while the other shows deafness in both ears.

Degenerative Myelopathy (DM)

Degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an inherited neurologic disorder of dogs characterized by gradual muscle wasting and loss of coordination typically beginning in the hind limbs.

Dilated Cardiomyopathy 1 and 2 in Doberman Pinschers

Dilated cardiomyopathy is a condition in which the heart has a decreased ability to pump blood. Two mutations associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in Doberman Pinschers have been identified. Testing for these mutations can identify individuals at risk for developing clinical symptoms of disease.

Dilute (D Locus/Blue)

Several gene variants are known to produce dilute coloration in dogs. Colors are lightened (diluted) to paler shades as a result of the variants' effects on pigmentation.

Dominant Black (K Locus)

The Dominant Black gene (K Locus) affects pigment switching between eumelanin (black) and phaeomelanin (red or yellow) by interacting with the Agouti and MC1R genes.

Exercise-Induced Collapse (EIC)

Exercise-induced collapse is a genetic neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle weakness, lack of coordination, and life-threatening collapse after intense exercise in otherwise apparently healthy dogs.

Factor VII Deficiency

Factor VII deficiency is a mild to moderate inherited blood clotting disorder. Affected dogs may appear mostly healthy but may be prone to increased bleeding tendency.

Furnishings and Improper Coat

A dominant variant of the R-spondin-2 gene produces the longer mustache and eyebrows seen in wire-haired dogs and other breeds.

GM1 Gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu

GM1 gangliosidosis in the Shiba Inu breed (SI-GM1) is a progressive, lethal disorder caused by abnormal accumulation of a fatty molecule important for normal functioning of nerve cells in the brain.

Hairlessness in Terriers

The American Hairless Terrier is a breed that includes hairless and coated varieties. The breed's characteristic hairlessness is inherited as a recessive trait.

Harlequin Pattern in Great Danes

Harlequin is a pattern seen in Great Danes resulting from the complex interaction of the Merle and Harlequin genes on black pigment.

Hereditary Cataracts (HC) in Australian Shepherds

Cataracts (clouding of the lens of the eye) are a common cause of blindness in dogs. In Australian Shepherds, a genetic mutation causes hereditary cataracts, which may start forming after 2 years of age and show variable rate of progression and vision impairment.

Hereditary Nasal Parakeratosis (HNPK)

Hereditary nasal parakeratosis is an inherited, recessive genetic defect that affects specialized cells of the canine nose, resulting in the formation of a crust with cracks over the nasal area of young dogs.

Hyperuricosuria (HUU)

Hyperuricosuria is an inherited disorder characterized by elevated levels of uric acid in the urine that can lead to the formation of bladder/kidney stones.

Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (IGS)

Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) is a disorder found in Beagles and Border Collies where vitamin B12 is unable to be absorbed through the gut.

Intensity Dilution

The intensity coat color gene variant causes an extreme dilution of phaeomelanin (red or yellow pigment), resulting in a cream to white coat in dogs.

Juvenile Hereditary Cataract (JHC)

Juvenile hereditary cataracts are an inherited form of cataracts that commonly cause blindness in dogs by clouding the lens of the eye and affecting both eyes symmetrically.

MC1R including Mask, Grizzle, and Red/Cream (E Locus)

The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene controls production of the pigments eumelanin (black) and phaeomelanin (red/yellow). Six known variants of this gene are responsible for producing markings and coat colors including melanistic mask, grizzle/domino, black, and shades of red/yellow.

Merle

Merle is an incompletely dominant coat color pattern characterized by irregularly shaped patches of diluted pigment and solid color.

Narcolepsy in Doberman Pinschers

Narcolepsy is a disorder of the nervous system characterized by periods of sleepiness. This test detects a causal variant specific to Doberman Pinschers.

Narcolepsy in Labrador Retrievers

Narcolepsy in Labrador Retrievers is a sleeping disorder characterized by daytime sleepiness, fragmented sleep patterns, and sudden transient episodes of muscle weakness or paralysis triggered by play or food. This test detects a causal variant specific to Labrador Retrievers.

Natural Bobtail

Natural bobtail is a naturally occurring mutation in the T-box gene resulting in a shortened tail.

Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures (NEWS)

Neonatal encephalopathy with seizures is an inherited progressive brain disease of Standard Poodles and related crosses that is characterized by weakness, mobility issues, and seizures. Affected pups do not survive beyond seven weeks of age.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (NCL) in Golden Retrievers

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis results from the accumulation of granules in the neurons of the brain and spinal cord. This progressive neurological disorder manifests as behavioral changes coupled with a loss of coordination and blindness.

Osteochondrodysplasia (OCD) in Miniature Poodles

Osteochondrodysplasia is characterized by stunted growth and abnormal locomotion. Affected animals develop splayed hind limbs, enlarged joints, flattened rib cages, shortened and bent long bones, and deformed paws.

Parentage/Genetic Marker Report

This DNA-based parentage test uses microsatellite marker analysis to compare the DNA profile of an offspring to the profiles of possible parents.

Piebald/White Spotting (S Locus)

White spotting patterns that occur in many dog breeds do not have a uniform genetic basis, and the genetics are complex. In piebald/parti/random white spotting, the extent of white pattern expression varies, and markings are often asymmetrical.

Primary Lens Luxation (PLL)

Primary lens luxation is a painful inherited eye disorder where the lens of the eye moves from its normal position, causing inflammation and glaucoma. If untreated, the condition can rapidly lead to blindness.

Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) in Beagles

This inherited primary open angle glaucoma in Beagles results from a mutation in the gene ADAMTS10. The condition is characterized by increased pressure in the eye; nerve damage, vision loss, lens subluxation, and blindness may result.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) in Irish Setters

Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is characterized by degeneration of the retina resulting in progressive vision loss leading to total blindness. In Irish Setters and Irish Red and White Setters, dogs with this disease are typically completely blind before two years of age.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA1 and PRA2) in Golden Retrievers

Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is characterized by bilateral degeneration of the retina resulting in progressive vision loss leading to total blindness. More than one form of PRA affects Golden Retrievers, and causal mutations in three distinct genes have been identified; two of those mutations lead to PRA1 and PRA2.

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency (PKDef)

Pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKDef) is an inherited hemolytic anemia caused by a defect in the enzyme pyruvate kinase. Signs in affected dogs may include lack of energy and fatigue in dogs that appear otherwise fit.

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency (PKDef) in Labrador Retrievers

Pyruvate kinase deficiency in Labrador Retrievers is a chronic, severe hemolytic anemia caused by defective production of the enzyme pyruvate kinase. Signs in affected dogs may include lethargy, low exercise tolerance, and fatigue.

Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy (SAN) in Golden Retrievers

Sensory ataxic neuropathy is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by involuntary muscle movements and abnormal posture resulting from degeneration of the nerves controlling muscle movement. It affects both sexes but is only inherited maternally.

Spinal Dysraphism (SD) in Weimaraners

Spinal dysraphism (SD) in Weimaraner dogs is a genetic disorder present at birth that results from faulty embryonic development, leading to an abnormal gait as well as weakness and lack of coordination in the rear legs.

Susceptibility to Pug Dog Encephalitis (PDE)

Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME), also known as Pug dog encephalitis, is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that is usually progressive and fatal. Several genetic markers are associated with risk of developing NME.

Von Willebrand Disease I (vWD Type 1)

Von Willebrand disease I (vWD Type 1), an inherited bleeding disorder, results from a lack or reduced level of a normal blood clotting protein and is characterized by spontaneous hemorrhaging and prolonged bleeding after physical trauma.

Von Willebrand Disease II (vWD Type 2)

Von Willebrand disease II (vWD Type 2), an inherited bleeding disorder, results from a lack or reduced level of a normal blood clotting protein and is characterized by spontaneous hemorrhaging and prolonged bleeding after physical trauma. vWD Type 2 is rare.

Von Willebrand Disease III (vWD Type 3)

Von Willebrand disease III (vWD Type 3), an inherited bleeding disorder, results from a lack or reduced level of a normal blood clotting protein and is characterized by spontaneous hemorrhaging and prolonged bleeding after physical trauma. vWD Type 3 is the most severe form.