Horse Coat Color Panel

Description
Herd of horses with different coat colors

The horse coat color panel bundles together several diagnostic tests to evaluate coat color.

Panel can be purchased on MyVGL. See below for pricing and list of specific tests included in panel.

 

Note: Gray test included in this panel only detects presence or absence of gray. The panel report does not provide the number of copies of the gray gene.
Price

Promotional pricing until July 15, 2020: $80 per animal

Turnaround time
2-6 business days
Tests in This Panel

Red Factor

The extension gene, or red factor, determines whether a horse will have a chestnut base coat color or a black or bay base coat color.

Agouti (Bay/Black)

The agouti gene controls the distribution of black pigment, and determines whether a horse will have a bay or black base coat color.

Champagne

Champagne is a coat color dilution responsible for diluting both red and black pigment as well as causing pinkish/lavender skin and amber-colored eyes.

Cream

Cream is a dilution that causes the palomino, buckskin, smoky black, cremello, perlino, and smoky cream coat colors.

Dun Dilution

Dun is a coat color dilution characterized by lightening of the coat, with the head, lower legs, mane, and tail undiluted. Oftentimes, dun is also characterized by "primitive markings" such as a dark dorsal stripe, barring of the legs, shoulder stripes, and "cobwebbing" on the forehead.

Gray

The gray gene causes progressive depigmentation of the hair, often resulting in a color that is almost completely white by 6-8 years of age.

Pearl

Pearl is a coat color dilution that is characterized by a dilution of the coat, mane, and tail as well as a lightening of the skin.

Silver

The silver dilution dilutes black/brown pigment to lighten the manes and tails of black and bay horses to a flaxen or silver gray. The silver dilution is also associated with an inherited ocular syndrome known as Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies (MCOA).
Type of Sample

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