Created at the VGL Panda White Spotting in German Shepherd Dogs

Quick Summary

A mutation in the KIT gene has been found to be the source of the dominant white spotting pattern known as Panda that occurs in a line of German Shepherd Dogs.

German Shepherd with Panda markings
German Shepherd Dog with Panda pattern

Phenotype: The Panda pattern is characterized by symmetrical markings of white forelock, muzzle, chest, ventral abdomen, collar, and tip of the tail. The amount of white can vary from dog to dog.

Mode of Inheritance: Autosomal dominant

Alleles: N = Normal (no Panda), P = Panda pattern

Breeds appropriate for testing: German Shepherd Dog

Explanation of Results:

  • Dogs with N/N genotype are not expected to display the Panda pattern. They cannot transmit this Panda variant to any of their offspring.
  • Dogs with N/P genotype are expected to display the Panda white spotting pattern. They will transmit this Panda variant to 50% of their offspring.
  • Dogs with P/P genotype are expected to terminate development in utero (embryonic lethal); this genotype has never been observed in live dogs.
Price

$45 one test per animal
$65 two tests for coat color/fur type/bobtail (same animal)
$85 three tests for coat color/fur type/bobtail (same animal)
+ $15 each additional test if ordering more than three coat color/fur type/bobtail tests on the same animal

Additional Details

A mutation in the KIT gene has been found to be the source of the dominant white spotting pattern known as Panda that occurs in a line of German Shepherd dogs. This mutation is very recent: it appeared spontaneously in a female, Lewcinka's Franka von Phenom, born in 2000. The Panda pattern is characterized by symmetrical markings of white forelock, muzzle, chest, ventral abdomen, collar, and tip of the tail. The amount of white can vary from dog to dog. In the homozygous state, the Panda mutation is considered an early embryonic lethal as no live dogs with the pattern and with two copies of the mutation have been observed. Heterozygous dogs (one copy of the mutation) do not have any health defects associated with this pattern.

Testing for the Panda pattern to allows breeders to determine if white patterning is caused by this KIT gene mutation.

Turnaround Time
2-6 business days

Species

Dog

Type of Test

Results Reported As
Test Result Panda White Spotting
N/N No copies of the Panda mutation are present.
N/P 1 copy of the Panda mutation is present.
References

Wong, A.K., Ruhe, A.L., Robertson, K.R., Loew, E.R., Williams, D.C., & Neff, M.W. (2013). A de novo mutation in KIT causes white spotting in a subpopulation of German Shepherd dogs. Animal Genetics, 44(3), 305-310. doi: 10.1111/age.12006