Labrador Retriever Health Panel 1

Copper Toxicosis (Menkes and Wilson diseases)

Copper toxicosis is a metabolic disorder that can cause chronic liver failure and neurological problems that result from deviations in normal levels of copper in the body. This test identifies genetic variants associated with risk for copper toxicosis or copper deficiency in the Labrador Retriever, Doberman Pinscher and Black Russian Terrier.

Cystinuria Type I-A in Labrador Retrievers

Cystinuria type I-A is a kidney disorder in which the kidneys are unable to reabsorb cystine, leading to the formation of crystals in the urinary tract, which can cause urinary obstruction, difficulty in passing urine, and presence of blood in the urine.

Degenerative Myelopathy (DM)

Degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an inherited neurologic disorder of dogs characterized by gradual muscle wasting and loss of coordination typically beginning in the hind limbs. Testing is most appropriate for those breeds in which the clinical disease has been associated with the SOD1 allele.

Exercise-Induced Collapse (EIC)

Exercise-induced collapse is a genetic neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle weakness, lack of coordination, and life-threatening collapse after intense exercise in otherwise apparently healthy dogs.

Hereditary Nasal Parakeratosis (HNPK)

Hereditary nasal parakeratosis is an inherited, recessive genetic defect that affects specialized cells of the canine nose, resulting in the formation of a crust with cracks over the nasal area of young dogs.

Hyperuricosuria (HUU)

Hyperuricosuria is an inherited disorder characterized by elevated levels of uric acid in the urine that can lead to the formation of bladder/kidney stones.

Narcolepsy in Labrador Retrievers

Narcolepsy in Labrador Retrievers is a sleeping disorder characterized by daytime sleepiness, fragmented sleep patterns, and sudden transient episodes of muscle weakness or paralysis triggered by play or food. This test detects a causal variant specific to Labrador Retrievers.

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency (PKDef) in Labrador Retrievers

Pyruvate kinase deficiency in Labrador Retrievers is a chronic, severe hemolytic anemia caused by defective production of the enzyme pyruvate kinase. Signs in affected dogs may include lethargy, low exercise tolerance, and fatigue.

Stargardt Disease in Labrador Retrievers

Stargardt disease is a degenerative eye disorder resulting from the progressive loss of the photoreceptor cells that are responsible for sensing light. Affected dogs show a decline in vision with age but appear to retain some vision throughout their life.

Sample Collection

Dog DNA tests are carried out using cells brushed from your dog's cheeks and gums. The preferred cytology brushes are sent to you by mail, or you may provide your own brushes. For accepted alternative brushes, click here

We recommend waiting until puppies are at least three weeks old before testing.

 

Dog having its cheeks and gums brushed for DNA samples
Cheek and gum brushing technique for canine DNA sample collection

Step-By-Step:

  1. Make sure the dog has not had anything to eat or drink for at least 1 hour prior to collecting sample.
  2. When swabbing puppies, isolate each puppy from the mother, littermates and any shared toys for 1 hour prior to swabbing. Puppies should not have nursed or eaten for 1 hour prior to collecting sample.
  3. If collecting samples from more than one dog, make sure to sample one dog at a time and wash your hands before swabbing another dog.
  4. Label brush sleeve with name or ID of dog to be sampled.
  5. Open brush sleeve by arrow and remove one brush by its handle.
  6. Place bristle head between the dog’s gums and cheek and press lightly on the outside of the cheek while rubbing or rotating the brush back and forth for 15 seconds.
  7. Wave the brush in the air for 20 seconds to air dry.
  8. Insert brush back into sleeve.
  9. Repeat steps 5 - 8 for each unused brush in sleeve on a fresh area of cheek and gums. Make sure to use and return all brushes sent by the VGL. In most cases, it will be 3 brushes per dog. If using interdental gum brushes, please note that the VGL requires 4 brushes per dog and only moderate or wide interdental gum brushes are accepted.
  10. Do not seal brushes in sleeve.
  11. Place all samples in an envelope and return to the address provided.

ATTENTION:

  • Do not collect saliva/drool – the key to obtaining a good sample is getting cheek cells on the swab
  • Do not rub swab on the dog’s tongue or teeth – this will result in poor quality sample
  • Do not collect a sample from a puppy that has recently nursed – the mother’s genetic material can rub off on the puppy’s mouth and contaminate the sample

Species

Dog

Type of Panel